Category Archives: Networking

Cracking the Coding Interview: 189 Programming Questions and Solutions

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By Gayle Laakmann McDowell

I am not a recruiter. I am a software engineer. And as such, I know what it’s like to be asked to whip up brilliant algorithms on the spot and then write flawless code on a whiteboard. I’ve been through this as a candidate and as an interviewer.

Cracking the Coding Interview, 6th Edition is here to help you through this process, teaching you what you need to know and enabling you to perform at your very best. I’ve coached and interviewed hundreds of software engineers. The result is this book.

Learn how to uncover the hints and hidden details in a question, discover how to break down a problem into manageable chunks, develop techniques to unstick yourself when stuck, learn (or re-learn) core computer science concepts, and practice on 189 interview questions and solutions.

These interview questions are real; they are not pulled out of computer science textbooks. They reflect what’s truly being asked at the top companies so that you can be as prepared as possible. WHAT’S INSIDE?

  • 189 programming interview questions, ranging from the basics to the trickiest algorithm problems.
  • A walk-through of how to derive each solution, so that you can learn how to get there yourself.
  • Hints on how to solve each of the 189 questions, just like what you would get in a real interview.
  • Five proven strategies to tackle algorithm questions, so that you can solve questions you haven’t seen.
  • Extensive coverage of essential topics, such as big O time, data structures, and core algorithms.
  • A behind the scenes look at how top companies like Google and Facebook hire developers.
  • Techniques to prepare for and ace the soft side of the interview: behavioral questions.
  • For interviewers and companies: details on what makes a good interview question and hiring process

Comeback Careers: Rethink, Refresh, Reinvent Your Success–At 40, 50, and Beyond

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By Mika Brzezinski

STRONG, WISER, BETTER

An Essential Guide for Reentering, Reinventing, or Rebooting Your Career at Any Age

So many women hit midlife and realize: it’s time for a career change. Maybe you’re yearning to try something new, or you’re sensing that layoffs are coming and you need a backup plan. Perhaps you paused, or downsized your career to raise children, and you’re ready to rejoin the workforce. How do you reboot, relaunch, return to, or reinvent a career at age 40? Or 50? Or 60? And how can you create a career and life that will provide you with purpose and financial security for years to come?

In Comeback Careers, New York Times bestselling author and co-host of MSNBC’s Morning Joe Mika Brzezinski and her sister-in-law Ginny Brzezinski have teamed up to show you that career reinvention is possible at any age. You have the skills, experience and maturity; it’s time to own them. For this book, Mika and Ginny interviewed dozens of career-changers working in a variety of fields, from finance to academics to art. They share successful relaunchers’ secrets to overcoming obstacles both internal and external and their step-by-step processes and candid advice. They also reveal key strategies from top job coaches, resume-writers, and LinkedIn experts, tailored to the special challenges of mid-career job seekers.

It’s time to rewrite the narrative. You are stronger, wiser, and better at the midpoint, and Comeback Careers is a roadmap to your career reinvention and fulfillment.

Job Hunting Secrets: (from someone who’s been there)

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By Clark Finnical

Many recruiters, HR and hiring managers spread myths, misconceptions and sometimes, downright lies, now its time for job seekers to know the truth. Readers say,

Once I started, I couldn’t put it down. ~ Kathy Burkhardt, Regional Director of Health Information

You can tell the author has walked a mile, or five, in a job seeker’s shoes because this book truly thinks of everything. ~ Kristin Sherry, Career Coach

I’ve consulted for the Labor Department and I’ve never seen a book as thorough, well-researched, and helpful as this one. ~ Chris Largent, Academy Director, University Lecturer & Adjunct Faculty.

I’ve had Lee Hecht Harrison coaching and read articles on job hunting. Your book distilled the best advice in one easy to read and understandable source; for $20 retail, it’s the best deal I’ve come across ever! . ~ Tom Weisbeck, CSP

This book has a lot of great information to help you…read between the lines and the hidden “code” (the runaround) we often get when we begin the application process. ~ Barbara Bermudez, Transcription Manager

You will be surprised to find that a successful job search requires ignoring much of what you are told.

A Critical Interviewing Mistake!

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By Brad Remillard

Candidates more often that not miss one of the best opportunities during the interview to shine, to differentiate themselves, and demonstrate their ability to do the job. What a great opportunity missed!!

In most interviews, the interviewer even sets the candidate up with the opportunity to shine and candidates blow right past it. The interviewer asks the soft ball question, “Do you have any questions for me?” A golden opportunity to shine. The questions you ask can outshine every answer you have given so far in the interview.

However, time and time again, I hear candidates do one of two things:

  1. Answer,”No, not really. Most of my questions were answered during the interview.” What a terrible answer. How did the interviewer answer “MOST” of your questions, when they were asking you questions.
  2. Reply with one or two (occasionally someone stands out and asks three) standard, unimportant, basic no-brainer, no forethought questions such as, “What is the budget?” or “What is your management style?” Again, these reveal the candidate has not prepared and is very shallow.
  3. Actually, there is a third, the candidate sits there like a deer in the headlights trying to think of something to say.

This is your opportunity to ask questions that demonstrate your ability to understand the job and what performance standards will be. Challenge the interviewer, ask “Why” are you doing X, probe deeply into the issues you will face once on board, how they manage, etc. Every candidate knows this question is coming in one form or the other. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Asking questions is a sign of strength, confidence and demonstrates a depth of knowledge. As a recruiter for almost 30 years, when a hiring manager calls back and says, “This person really asked me some great questions. They made me think in the interview.” I know that person is getting the job.

One component of your interviewing preparation should be questions to ask. Not just questions about the company, but specific questions about the job, ask “why”, ask about communications, ask about past issues, ask about future challenges, ask about people, ask about KPI’s, ask about systems, there are so many issues to discuss to make sure you will be successful.

The best advice I have is ask the same questions you will be asking once in the job to be successful. You might as well know them before you accept the position. Otherwise, it might be a position where you can’t succeed.

Get That Job!: The Quick and Complete Guide to a Winning Interview

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By Thea Kelley

Praised as “Excellent” on Forbes.com, this concise interview guide gives readers proven tips and clear instructions to prepare for breakthrough interviews.

Job seekers will learn to:

  • Identify and communicate their unique strengths, their “key selling points.”
  • Understand why employers ask many of the most common interview questions – and how to answer with confidence.
  • Succeed with video interviews, behavioral interviews and panels.
  • Build an arsenal of success stories.
  • Ace every step – from the first screening to accepting the offer.

“A practical guide to authentic, well prepared interviewing, Get That Job! offers an abundant tool kit of resources – including great answers to challenging questions every job seeker is sure to encounter. Kudos!” – Marie Zimenoff, Director of Career Thought Leaders and the Resume Writing Academy

Heard on The Street – Quantitative Questions from Wall Street Job Interviews

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By Timothy Falcon Crack

THIS IS A MUST READ! It is the first and the original book of quantitative questions from finance job interviews. Painstakingly revised over 23 years and 19 editions, Heard on The Street has been shaped by feedback from many hundreds of readers. With well over 50,000 copies in print, its readership is unmatched by any competing book. The revised 19th edition contains 226 quantitative questions collected from actual job interviews in investment banking, investment management, and options trading. The interviewers use the same questions year-after-year, and here they are with detailed solutions! This edition also includes 210 non-quantitative actual interview questions, giving a total of more than 435 actual finance job interview questions. There is also a recently revised section on interview technique based on Dr. Crack’s experiences interviewing candidates and also based on feedback from interviewers worldwide. The quant questions cover pure quant/logic, financial economics, derivatives, and statistics. They come from all types of interviews (corporate finance, sales and trading, quant research, etc.), and from all levels of interviews (undergraduate, MS, MBA, PhD). The first seven editions of Heard on the Street contained an appendix on option pricing. That appendix was carved out as a standalone book many years ago and it is now available in its revised fourth edition: “Basic Black-Scholes” (ISBN: 978-0-9941386-8-2). Dr. Crack did PhD coursework at MIT and Harvard, and graduated with a PhD from MIT. He has won many teaching awards, and has publications in the top academic, practitioner, and teaching journals in finance. He has degrees/diplomas in Mathematics/Statistics, Finance, Financial Economics and Accounting/Finance. Dr. Crack taught at the university level for over 25 years including four years as a front line teaching assistant for MBA students at MIT, and four years teaching undergraduates, MBAs, and PhDs at Indiana Univeristy. He has worked as an independent consultant to the New York Stock Exchange and to a foreign government body investigating wrong doing in the financial markets. His most recent practitioner job was as the head of a quantitative active equity research team at what was the world’s largest institutional money manager.

Land Your Dream Job Anywhere – The Complete Mac’s List Guide to Finding Work You Love

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By Mac Prichard

Job hunting is not an innate ability; no one is born with the magical power to land a great job. It is a learned skill that anyone can master with practice.

Unfortunately, most people are never taught how to look for a job. High school and college teach us the technical skills to use in our career, but we are never taught the nuts-and-bolts of how to conduct a strategic job search. Instead, we are left mostly to rely on trial and error.

That’s the reason this book exists—to outline a proven job-search strategy that actually works. You’ll find a process that results in a faster, less-frustrating job search—one that maximizes your chances of finding a job you love.

Secrets to Finding an Executive Position While Still Employed

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By Erin Kennedy 

Following are highlights from Erin’s article:  “The Secrets to Finding an Executive Position While Still Employed”

Think Outside the “Networking” Box

  • There are many ways to network.
  • The hidden job market is the best way to go about conducting a secret job search.
    • Attending professional events or using the tools offered by LinkedIn, are excellent ways to learn about jobs not yet advertised.
  • Even volunteering or being involved in your community can lead to new opportunities, so being active can move your job search forward as well.

Be Careful When Using LinkedIn

  • Use LinkedIn when searching for a new job.
    • Begin by updating settings.
      • If settings are not updated appropriately, connections may be able to see every change to profile.
    • Remember that co-workers and bosses are often included as members of the Connections network.
    • When working on LinkedIn profile development, alter settings to ensure the wrong people don’t see any changes made.

Strictly Confidential

  • It’s important to keep things under wraps, until ready to go public. Keep things confidential.
    • Use the term “confidential applicant” instead of name, to avoid showing up on the current employer’s search for a new candidate.
    • Not using the company’s name anywhere on the resume is important.

Don’t Use Company Time

  • Job searches should not be done on company time.
    • If your current boss finds out, there’s a chance you could be fired.
    • If a potential employer finds out search was conducted on company time, they may think you’ll do the same to them and not offer you a job.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Erin_Kennedy/161383

Job Search Tips – What Phrases Should You Use on Job Search Sites?

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By Adnan Masood   

If you are looking for a job, you are likely to search online. The good news? There are many job search sites for you to choose from. Aside from the larger and well-known sites, there are also those that are locally run and operated. Regardless of which website you use, how you search is very important. After all, the fastest way to seek employment is to find jobs that you are qualified for.

In terms of searching for job search sites, how can you do this?

Here are three different ways that you can find open positions that you are qualified for online:

Job Search Tip #1 – Search with the Job Title Name.  This is a pretty simple approach, yet it is the best. What position are you looking to find? Is it a retail manager? If so, ideal search phrases include retail management, retail manager, or store manager. Is it a work at home sales position? If so, ideal search phrases include home-based sales, inbound sales rep, work at home sales, and so forth.

Job search sites pull keywords from your search and pair it with keywords inside a job listing. Since a company always labels a job with the title, this method of searching produces the best results.

Job Search Tip #2 – Search with Job Duty.  Another way to find a job on a job search site is to do a search with a duty. For example, a retail worker often must perform sales work, customer service, and checking out customers. Ideal search phrases include customer service, cashier, sales, and so forth.

As previously stated, job search sites pull keywords from your search phrase and attempt to match up those phrases with keywords inside a job listing posted online. While the best results are produced by using a job title, you can search with a job duty instead as well. The only downside is that some duties are similar for a wide range of jobs; therefore, you are likely to get more non-relevant results with this approach.

Job Search Tip #3 – Search with Company Name.  Do you want to work for a specific company? If so, you can also do a search with that company name. If you are looking for a better paying job, this approach is ideal. However, if you are looking for any decent position that will provide a paycheck now, it is best to use one of the above-mentioned options that produce more results.

While this method of searching job sites does work, results are not guaranteed. Why? While a good percentage of companies do include their company name, some like to keep this information hidden. While it won’t hurt to use this method of searching when seeking employment, know that you do have other options. You should use those other options if your search does not produce any results.

So there you have it; you now got a few great suggestions on the different methods of searching when it comes to looking for employment on job search sites.

Guide To Rethinking Resumes

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By Richard N. Bolles

The first resume book from the What Color Is Your Parachute? career guru Richard Bolles.

Resumes get an average of eight seconds of attention before going in the trash—or getting on the shortlist. That’s just one of the findings reported here, as legendary career expert Richard N. Bolles presents new research about resumes in a guide that summarizes everything job-hunters and career-changers need to know about this essential tool.

This timely resource features the latest research on important resume topics such as keywords, soft skills, scanning software, social media, and online posting. Bolles argues that on the basis of what we now know, we need to rethink what a resume is—and how it should be written. He details the words that must be avoided, and the words that must be used, on a resume that wins you interviews.

This slim volume distills a huge amount of information down to its very essence. Armed with tips and shortcuts based on the author’s decades of experience, you can craft a resume and cover letter that will stand out to your dream employers—and increase your chances of getting interviews and landing jobs.

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